Theresa May and the ‘Missing’ Child Sex Abuse Files

Over the past week, Theresa May’s tenure and competence as Home Secretary has come under increased scrutiny, particularly in regards to the issue of police cuts and national security.

However, in the week that Britons go to the polls, we consider another aspect of her past record which calls into question her competency, or perhaps lack of.Investigation into historic child abuse claims

In February 2013, then Home Office permanent secretary, Mark Sedwill, commissioned an investigation into a collection of documents relating to historic child abuse cases dating from 1979–1999.

Investigation into historic child abuse claims
In February 2013, then Home Office permanent secretary, Mark Sedwill, commissioned an investigation into a collection of documents relating to historic child abuse cases dating from 1979–1999.

Sedwill quickly discovered that 114 potentially relevant files were missing, presumed lost or destroyed.

Among these documents there is believed to have been a dossier which was passed to Lord Brittan by the late Conservative MP Geoffrey Dickens.

Whilst Home Secretary, Theresa May tasked NSPCC head, Peter Wanless, to review the Sedwill investigation, and look into the Home Office failings.

Theresa May has since admitted that there “might have been” a cover-up at the Home Office in the 1980s concerning allegations that politicians were involved in child sex abuse. However, she stated that an official review found that the claim was “not proven”.

Nevertheless, The Wanless report concluded that “shambolic” record keeping at the Home Office meant a definite answer could not be given either way. Though the files remained missing, it claimed that no one person could be directly connected to the allegations.

Former child protection manager Peter McKelvie claimed that at least 20 prominent people in Westminster had abused children. There was the suggestion that they used children’s homes as a “supply line” but this is yet to be substantiated.

Mr McKelvie discovered potential links between paedophiles and the government when he was assisting police in investigating convicted paedophile and founding member of twisted organisation PIE (Paedophile Information Exchange), Peter Righton.

Ex-child protection officer Peter McKelvie who resigned as an adviser to the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA).

Ex-child protection officer Peter McKelvie who resigned as an adviser to the Independent Inquiry into Child Sexual Abuse (IICSA).

According to McKelvie, amongst evidence seized from Righton’s home in 1992 there was a haul of documents pointing to a “very well organised paedophile network”, dating as far back as the 1950s and 1960s.

Several police operations into child sex abuse are still ongoing, including Operation Fairbank and Operation Fernbridge—a probe into up to 40 MPs involved or complicit in child abuse—and others investigating particular children’s homes and authorities.

Allegations of child murders and sinister orgies in the Dolphin Square flats complex in Westminster have also surfaced during the course of these investigations.

A paedophile ring is said to have been run by a “powerful elite” including not only MPs, but also ministers and an even larger number of people aware of its existence; people that could have stopped it, yet did nothing.

[more…]


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