It’s Official – Teens Diagnosed With MS After Gardasil Vaccines

In 2015, a Scandinavian study found no increased risk for Multiple Sclerosis or demyelinating disease among 4 million females, of whom 800,000 received the HPV vaccination.

But at a recent forum in San Diego, researchers presented two cases of multiple sclerosis (MS) that had developed in teenagers after receiving Gardasil, the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

The study author Ye Hu reported on 2 teens who experienced MS symptoms 1 to 2 weeks after receiving the vaccination.

A 14-year-old male started to experience left retro-orbital pain and blurred vision in the left eye 2 weeks after receiving his third dose of Gardasil. He was diagnosed with left optic neuritis and reported a second occurrence 2 months after his initial symptoms.

A 17-year-old female started to experience blurred vision in the right eye 2 weeks after receiving her first dose of Gardasil. A right frontal enhancing lesion was seen on brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). She was diagnosed with right optic neuritis and did not receive further doses of Gardasil. One week after discharge, she experienced intermittent numbness and weakness in her lower extremities in addition to blurred vision in her right eye. A repeat brain MRI revealed a new left parieto-occipital enhancing lesion.

It is pleasing to read of this research, which is the start of much more to come and signals an opening up of a conversation that acknowledges the problems associated with the HPV vaccines manifesting in thousands of adverse events and hundreds of deaths occurring after the vaccination.

According to VAERS, the CDC’s vaccine adverse event reporting system, there have been 53 cases of multiple sclerosis reported after vaccination with Gardasil and two following the new HPV vaccine Gardasil 9. This is the tip of the iceberg as very few adverse events are reported with most people ignorant of where or how they are to go about the process of having their adverse health event recorded. Then there’s the problem of determining if symptoms of an adverse event are causally linked to vaccines or a coincidence.

Canadian researchers, Lucija Tomljenovic and Christopher A Shaw, note that there are no conclusive tests available to determine whether adverse events are causally linked to vaccinations. They discuss the fact that many of the symptoms reported to the various reporting systems following HPV vaccination point to a diagnosis of cerebral vasculitis (inflammation of blood vessels in the brain) but are not recognized as such. Symptoms of cerebral vasculitis include:

  • intense persistent migraines
  • syncope
  • seizures
  • tremors and tingling
  • myalgia
  • locomotor abnormalities
  • psychotic symptoms and cognitive deficits

The symptoms of multiple sclerosis can also be similar to those of other diseases such as acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM) and include problems with coordination and speech, sight difficulties, fatigue and weakness.

In my book Gardasil: Fast-Tracked and Flawed I relate the experience of Kristin Clulow, a 26-year-old Australian woman who after her second shot of Gardasil found her health beginning to unravel in a devastating way.

It started with a temporary loss of vision and mobility problems that made it impossible for her to run, jump, dance or wear her beloved heels. Then her handwriting failed her: “Handwriting just doesn’t suddenly go,” she cried. Worse was to come when Kristin’s  speech became slurred: “They thought I’d had a stroke.”

Kristin was initially given the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis and treated unsuccessfully with corticosteroids. Further tests revealed that she was suffering from acute disseminated encephalomyelitis (ADEM), an immune-mediated inflammatory demyelinating condition that predominately affects the white matter of the brain and spinal cord.

Multiple sclerosis is a debilitating disease affecting the central nervous system with interference occurring in nerve impulses within the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves. The average age for a diagnosis of multiple sclerosis is 30, but in recent years the number of younger women diagnosed with the disease in Australia has risen dramatically. It used to affect men and women equally but now women are three times more likely to be affected.

Recently, I came across a young woman who was relieved to be diagnosed with MS because no-one had been able to tell her why she was unwell. Her symptoms began when she was 13 and consisted of headaches, sensory deficit affecting her leg, and fatigue resulting in her missing a lot of school.

I wondered as I listened to her story if she might be suffering a vaccine injury.  Neurological dysfunction is one of the very common adverse events of the Gardasil vaccine. Her symptoms started at 13, the age that Gardasil is given to young teens as part of the school vaccination program.

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